Quality Created Marketing: Blizzard’s “Unintentional” Boon From Flexible Release Dates

Blizzard’s policy of not releasing a game until it is polished and absolutely complete has worked out for both Blizzard, and for their game buying fans. With each games’ announcement, the online community explodes. Free marketing abound! With each delay of a Blizzard release, free marketing abound! When the game finally hits the hands of its wanting fans the level of anticipation has reached the same height of a Protoss Carrier.

Per Blizzard's Diablo 3 website (FAQ section).

For Blizzard, this practice of releasing games only when things are perfect has been awarded to them due to the money they’ve generated via World of Warcraft [WOW]. It also helps that each game they release, that has an extended development phase, is an award winning, financial success. With ample cash on hand, Blizzard can stretch out their development, alpha and beta phases. Many other gaming companies can not afford the luxury of having a negotiable release date, and in the case of Blizzard, the release date is not just negotiable but very flexible.

What was originally just the practice of giving its gamers/fans the most faultless iteration of its next game, Blizzard has created a marketing strategy original to the gaming industry. The constant delay and changing of release dates has now turned into a buzz machine for Blizzard. With some of the most appreciated and accepted games in the PC arena (Diablo, WarCraft, WOW and StarCraft) it’s understandable that Blizzard wants to get each release right. I do not think the delays in release are intentional but obviously Blizzard is aware of the storm it creates every time it even mentions another delay.

You can find the devil on Amazon.

When subscribers for WOW started to fall off slightly and Blizzard stock started to bleed (both happened in late 2011), I wrongfully predicted that Blizzard would, for the first time, hurry a release. I thought the pressures of share owners would finally put the squeeze on Blizzard and they would release a game before they wanted to. I am happy to be wrong. Perhaps Blizzard share holders have some faith and understanding of what makes Blizzard, just as polished as its games.

Once again, a Diablo 3 release date announcement is expected soon. Once again, the internet and gaming media are a buzz. Once again, Blizzard gets some free marketing. Once again, I am drooling at the opportunity to personally rip Diablo’s horns from his head.

Heisting My Salary

Still on the job hunt after four months I have decided to go a desperate route, make a career change and take back some of that bailout money through a more direct method. I am practicing to be a bank robber and an all around selfish Robin Hood and I have the perfect trainer in PAYDAY: The Heist.

PAYDAY: The Heist, from developer OVERKILL Software and published by Sony Online Entertainment, is Left 4 Dead turned “left 4 loot”. You and three other criminally gifted cohorts are smooth operating, TARP stealing and lethal when necessary, band of brothers. You are the most active members of Occupy Wall Street.

LR: Unique enemy units the Shield, Cloaker, Bulldozer and Taser.

The four of us (Dallas, Hoxton, Wolf and Chains) operate as a team looking to score money through differing heist scenarios, all while wearing masks that are a mix between those worn in the movie Dead Presidents and Point Break. From the token bank job in the scenario First World Bank to the corrupt stealing from the corrupt in the map Panic Room – where you lift a cash filled safe room out of a five story meth lab – each map requires a different approach. Also, adding to the suspense is the lack of a tutorial that walks you through the how-to-does and what-to-does. Should you try to stay inconspicuous as long as possible or should you go all Val Kilmer in the movie Heat and lay down covering fire to open up your escape in the map Heat Street?

PAYDAY: The Heist has a leveling system that unlocks new weapons, team helping drops and passive perks, but where it sets itself apart is in how you level up. There are three different class trees but instead of picking a class and then leveling up within it, you level up in each class depending on your style of play. If you hit head shots with your rifle on a regular basis then more unlocks become available under the Sharpshooter class. Lay down ammo bags on a regular basis then you will see more unlocks become available in the Support class. Have a Warcraft ogre like blood lust and an extreme hate for boys in blue (and special police units) then you will open up more mayhem enabling unlocks in the Assault class.

I am not ready to go pro in the heisting business as of yet (I only have 10 hours of practice) but give me enough time and I could, I mean Chains could, be visiting a local Bank of America very soon.

Whose behind the mask? Is it Patrick Swayze or maybe Robert De Niro? Could it be the infamous Mandingo?

Words From A Wing Nut: Interview with Lee Montgomery

Last post we explored the Full Motion Video [FMV] game bubble and the flops, and few gems, that made up this moment in gaming/development history. This week, I bring the nerd herd insight from an individual who was intimately involved in development during that age and had hands on with Rocket Science Games’ Wing Nuts: Battle in the Sky and Cadillacs and Dinosaurs. Lee Montgomery is the focus of this weeks post and GamingNerdHerder’s first interviewee (below).

—————————————————————————————————–

Lee Montgomery

Lee Montgomery is an Asst. Professor of Art at the University of New Mexico (Electronic Arts Area) with a B.A. in Film from Bard College and a MFA (New Genres) from the San Francisco Art Institute. In his own words: “I am an artist who works in as many areas of the ‘electronic arts’ as I am able.  My interests range from circuit building and bending, radio and TV transmission, computer programmed interactivity, and social engineering.”

—————————————————————————————————–

GamingNerdHerder [GNH]: What was your title and roll with Rocket Science Games?

I started as a production assistant, started working as a video editor, and eventually wound up as Asst. Game Designer for the Reactor levels of Cadillacs and Dinosaurs, and Game Designer for Wing Nuts.

GNH: There were a lot of subpar FMV games released in the 90s but Wing Nuts was solid. What did Wing Nuts do right that other FMV games did wrong? What did Wing Nuts do right that other FMV games didn’t do at all?

Funny thing is.. Wing Nuts was originally envisioned as a plug and play purchase from the studio that shot the material for Tomcat Alley on Sega CD.  That’s where all the video came from.  RSG, I think, originally saw itself as bringing Holywood to the Sega CD and so the idea was that we would build an updated “Dragon’s Lair” style engine like the Tomcat Alley engine, but with better compression (because we had engineers from the Quicktime team at Apple writing the video compression).  By the time the games were developed SegaCD had proven to be a short lived phenomenon, and the great sales of Tomcat Alley were revealed to have more to do with Tomcat Alley being one of the only things going for SegaCD.

So we had these assets for what was starting to look like a real dog of a game. So we had to figure out two things:

a) what was it about Tomcat (and thus Wing Nuts) that made it a dog?

b) how do we address those issues.

The Hollywood side of the equation determined that the amateurish acting and cheese-ball plot needed to be very clearly turned into comedy.  So a laugh track and sound effects were added…as well as a series of easter eggs with comedic value.

The game play side of the equation determined that as games like Doom and Virtua Fighter and Mortal Combat were our approximate competition, we needed to ramp up the interactivity… a lot!

Working with the engineer for the game (at the time I could barely get “hello world” compiled) we developed a full HUD and a points based system for taking down enemies.  We basically wrote a game which you played over the movie that coincidentally interacted with the footage.

There was definitely a misguided assumption that getting FMV to play on your machine at home would somehow be the essence of VR.  What many failed to pay attention to was the fact that the layers of compression that distorted the original video did much to remove the viewer from the experience.  Without a sufficient level of interactivity to keep viewers invested you didn’t really have a game.  I am sure there are a bunch of FMV developers from those days that are wondering how on earth the crudely rendered figures of DOOM registered as more appealing than their flat chunky blobs of video.

GNH: From your time spent directly involved in FMV game development there have been many changes. What do you see as the most relevant/significant change in video games from the days of FMV games compared to games being released now and why?

It’s interesting to look at a game like Fallout: New Vegas or Red Dead Redemption [RDR] now (or Grand Theft Auto, where some of the narrative techniques from failed FMV games are being used in a more fluid and engaging manner) within a fully realized 3D world where scenes can be somewhat rendered on the fly, instead of having to load video at 2MB per frame just for the visual appeal.

We no longer have laggy pauses for cut scenes, data loading happens more strategically, but really video always is limited to a linear constructed perspective, you always feel like you are riding a train and you can only tell the train where you want to change trains.  Greater processing power dedicated to rendering 3D worlds allows more of a sense of a world being constructed with nuanced rules you can follow.  A much more rewarding experience.   With Wing Nuts I think we succeeded (to the degree that we did) because the game play over the video had enough rules that one felt like they had some control over the results.  That complexity has just grown over time resulting in interactive narratives that are engaging and truly interactive.

GNH: How did your time spent in game development influence your current and past career choices and your current and past projects/shows?

I certainly would not be doing the kind of art work I do now had I not been exposed to the process of developing interactive content on a professional level.  It was interesting to quickly evolve from someone trained as an editor to someone considering interactivity as part of narrative content.  The work expanded my notions of what a game is and encouraged me to incorporate the game into how I thought about art.

GNH: What games are you currently playing?

I went through a long period of very occasional game playing over the past decade or so, this involved a little Warcraft, Tony Hawk, and Halo…

But recently I got a PS3 and was pretty impressed with RDR, I just finished one time through Fallout: New Vegas, and really enjoyed the depth of the experience, even if the game play sometimes felt a bit random….

GNH: What shows/projects are on the horizon for Lee Montgomery and were can we find more information about them?

I do a project called Neighborhood Public Radio which is currently engaged in a 3 part interactive program at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art.  You can see more about it at http://www.moca.org/party/npr/.

I also do some video work and generative art using a program called Processing.  I’m very into open source at the moment and am moving to a Linux based system that uses Processing and pd to develop interactive installations.

————————————————————————————————-

I again want to give my sincere thanks to Lee for his time and efforts, the nerd herd appreciates it. Join the conversation in the comments and thanks for the visit.