Up To Act Three In Diablo 3.

Unexplored depths are less scary to explore with friends.

So Diablo 3 [D3] had a bit of a bad start. Its launch could of gone a lot better, but 24 hours after its release Diablo had his horns affixed and millions addicted… myself included. Though some of us will never forget Error 37 and the Torchlight fanboy trolling that occurred during D3’s troubled release, I think all of us will remember that moment when we realized we were hooked on the Devil again. Once I had chosen my character and I experienced my first Monster Massacre (D3 keeps track of how many monsters you kill in a certain time frame, 58 is my current record) and experienced my first significant loot drop, I knew I was hooked to an old friend made new. Diablo has returned and it is glorious.

Have a case of arachnophobia? D3 will test your limits, especially with Cydaea – Azmodan’s concubine.

Crusading against Azmodan’s minions in the battlefields that make up Arreat Crater (yes, all that remains of the Worldstone and the mountain that held it is a hole) is a constant melee. You encounter one group of demons after another and you must use all your character’s skills, passive or otherwise, to survive, especially when venturing alone. Each mini battle feels grandiose and after each Monster Massacre you take a deep breath, and prepare for the next one. Your characters powers feel like they should. They feel accurate for a race that is part angel and part demon, these powers are appropriate to the nephalem of Sanctuary. From Act I on the  super human abilities of your character are immersive and provide the proper amount of feed back to the player. This is the first Diablo that has instigated shit talking to the dead demons at my feet. On multiple occasions I have blurted out, “Suck it you bastards!” in response to Monster Massacre popping up on my screen.

Massacre + Loot = Win.

What D3, and all the Diablo’s preceding it, does well, is loot. D3 sticks to its shinies roots, and then turns it up to 11. My first unique item was a moment worth telling others. Actually, I did convey my excitement to my girlfriend upon finding a unique helmet, to which she replied,”So what does that mean?” I guess some people just don’t appreciate shinies as much as a Diablo junkies does. A brilliant move by Diablo, other than making loot drop better when playing with a group, is the addition of the loot focused moster appropriately called the Treasure Goblin. This goblin can be found throughout D3’s environments, shitting gold across the map. If you kill it before it ducks away into its portal, you receive a generous loot drop. My first three deaths in D3 were the direct results of my greed and of the Treasure Goblin. All three times I felt like a stock broker betting on credit default swaps, hoping for a big payout but never considering the risk. I chased that goblin and his riches across an entire map, three times, and each time I aggroed almost every creature in the area, then died. The best way to best the Treasure Goblin is to corner him before he awakens the rest of the map, otherwise you should just cut your loses and save your life. Then again, you could miss out on some unique, or even legendary, shinies. Ah, just chase the little bastard.

Circled in red, a Treasure Goblin being PWND!

A crown meant for a king.

D3 does everything you would expect/want from the third game of the Diablo series. Fighting is more fun than ever. Loot is one the most important elements to the game, hell, it already has its own Ebay built into it. Are you a nephalem who grew up on Diablo in its original form? Don’t worry, D3 is a nephalem nostelgia fest, with hundreds of references to the first Diablo. Hell, my first legendary item… Leoric’s Crown!  Looking to do some ample button smashing and mouse clicking like you did in D2’s Hell difficulty? Don’t sweat hell’s heat, D3 has four difficulty levels: Normal; Nightmare; Hell and Inferno. The only troublesome thing I’ve encountered with D3, is finding the will to stop playing long enough to write about it.

10 Minutes With The Devil: Diablo 3’s [Error 37] Release

Diablo is just as infuriating and conniving as he was in Diablo 1 and Diablo 2 but for the time being, it’s for the wrong reasons. After setting up my Battle.net account and installing the game, I feverishly anticipate the opening cinematics. It didn’t matter that I had seen the opening sequence at least a dozen times before, this time was different. This time I was watching Deckard Cain convey his worries to his niece Leah (smart move Blizzard, adding the h at the end will keep the Lucas lawyers away), while my very own copy of the game set in front of me. When Deckard Cain asks Leah, “You do believe me don’t you Leah?” and the sky falls down on them in the Tristam Cathedral, I quickly answer, “Yes.” That however, is where and when my belief in Diablo’s third coming… ended.

As soon as Deckard Cain states, “It has begun,” is when my fun with Diablo 3 concluded. After the excitement of the opening cinematic you arrive at the log in screen for Diablo 3. With my account already created and my email address verified, I input my user name and password. Error 37. Here begins an error that will live on in infamy, via internet memes, for years to come. Of course I cancel and try again. Error 37. And again. Error 37. Taking a breath I exit out of D3 and give it another go. Error 37. The message board on the right hand side of the login screen addresses the issues with logging in, and state they will be fixed by 1:30PDT. I rejoice for a bit, it is 2PM CT and well pass 1:30PDT. I try to log in again.

Internet memes, commence.

Error 75. That is the next error I am faced with after my most recent attempt to log in. My fears of Diablo returning with his minions are replaced with the realization that I will not be able to see them nor stop them for the time being. Diablo will go unchecked in the world of Sanctuary, not because I lack the courage to face him but because of his brothers, the real Prime Evils, Error 37 and Error 75. I understand it is launch day for one of the most anticipated games in recent memory. I understand servers will be under a lot of stress but you can’t help but feel a bit of hell fire on the back of your neck as you stare at another error screen.

One of the lesser known Prim Evils, Error 75.

Once the lava cooled in my veins, and I embraced the teachings of the Dalai Lama for five minutes, I returned to the login screen. This time I am rewarded with a box that puts a check mark next to “Connected to Battle.net server” then another by “Authenticated” then finally, next to “Retrieving Hero List.” I am logged in and ready to create my character that will push back the hellspawn spewed from the ass of the Devil himself. I create my Monk, Dalai Camel, and exit out. My battle versus the Devil’s minions will have to wait.

*On a side note. Read the brief description for the Barbarian within the Quick Start Guide. Who does the line, “Armored in thick plate and driven by rage, these primal fighters wish only to crush their enemies and see them driven before them,” remind you of?

Lipstick On The Collar: Cheating Can Spice Up Your PC Gaming

I cheat. I cheat regularly. After running a game through its paces I usually look for a particular mod that frees up my in game options, and garners me a bit of an advantage. A mod is not exactly the most accurate term, more or less it’s a cheat that I am looking for. Before you raise your Cardinal crest in protest, please know I only use cheats in single player games or in single player modes-I do not cheat in multiplayer games. The cheats/editors I am after are ones that turn a very challenging game into a more casual version, or add a bit more life to a game that’s lost some of its luster. Much like how a mod adds new life to a game, whose mechanics seem tired, cheating is essentially its ugly stepsister.

The little engine that could.

After 200+ hours of roaming the mountains and streams of Skyrim I wanted to ease my burden, of carrying a burden. Using the console cheats (left behind by the developer) I changed my carrying capacity to match that of the Hulk, and increased my personal treasury to a level that would rival Tony Stark’s. In a matter of seconds I gave my character the gold and towing capacity that would of taken hours to obtain, if ever. I didn’t break the game but manipulated it into a form that renewed my interest in playing it regularly again.

Plenty of gold and a high enough carry weight to haul it.

Shogun 2 is a challenging game. It requires strategy and foresight to even attempt to overthrow the current Shogunate, and dam near perfect tactics to hold onto the title yourself. After tediously and slowly carving out a Chosokabe Shogunate, during my second attempt at conquering feudal Japan, I felt drained, but accomplished. It took hours of planning and hours of investing in my provinces to finally be able to raise an army worthy of challenging the Shogunate. It took hours of frantic troop movements and a handful of lost provinces, to repel the Shogunate army and his allies. It took every spare koku and troop, peasant or samurai, to hold Kyoto. It also helped that I could load up my prior turn if a decision to attack a castle or fleet worked against me.

Shogun 2 is, in its original form, not a casual game, but use a hex editor to boost your koku count and it can be. After my strenuous slog to Shogunate I was ready to keep Shogun 2 off my recently played list, but after doing some internet digging I found its saving grace. A hex editor allows you to manipulate fundamental binary data, in this case Shogun 2’s koku count. This simple to use editor turned a game I wouldn’t of touched in months into a game I couldn’t wait to launch again. It turned a fiercely difficult strategy game into a casual, samurai slaughtering, jaunt across feudal Japan. Cheating brought new life to a couple of old girls, and no one broke up with me because of it.

Yeah my treasury is overflowing but look at that profit margin.

Legend Of Grimrock: A Bit Of D&D, Without All The Work.

I’ve never been more excited to find a loin clothe or a pair of sandals in a game before. When I found a cloak for my rogue styled lizard man, Lando Calizardian, I actually yelled out, “Holy sh*t, a cloak!”. That is the kind of atmosphere Legend of Grimrock creates; items are not littered throughout its narrow dungeon hallways like they are in Skyrim, dead monsters don’t regularly drop magical items as they do in Diablo 3. In Legend of Grimlock, scarcity is in abundance, as is tension.

What's around the corner or down the next flight of steps? Legend of Grimrock keeps you scared and guessing.


Legend of Grimrock pays homage to the grid based movement games of the DOS era, and it does it very well. Almost Human Ltd., who run their offices out of the bottom floor of an apartment building, are the small Finnish based developers behind Legend of Grimrock. Almost Human have perfectly captured the fun of games like Eye of the Beholder and Dungeon Master, and sprinkled in the perfect amount of modern to make it appeal to today’s gamer.

Save often, not just at save crystal locations, because you will die often.

The grid based movement reminds me of another game that dictates movement via squares, Dungeons & Dragons. Many elements of the book based RPG game can be seen within Legend of Grimrock. The roles the four individuals, positioned in a 2×2 formation, are almost identical to the roles of my party members from past D&D encounters. The two individuals leading the way are boneheads with bats (swords, axes, or maces) who dish out punishment while acting as a shield for the more fragile individuals positioned behind them – they essentially act as tanks do in many MMO games or like warriors in D&D. Behind the meat shields is the aforementioned rogue Lando Calizardian, who is good with a bow and other projectile weapons (but can also be designed to be an effective assassin who is handy with a dagger). The final character type can almost be guessed is you have any experience with D&D. My green bipedal bug mage, Gandolf the Green, has the most potential for damage output, and the most potential to perish.

Gandolf the Green is my mage and potion master.

With these four individuals (preset or completely customizable), who are pardon of their crimes once they are dropped off at the top of Mount Grimrock, you must make your way through a maze of monsters and traps on your way to freedom. If you are in need of a dungeon crawler cure then Legend of Grimrock is the perfect potion, just watch your step.

Trap doors; get used to seeing them, and falling down them.

The Engagement Is Off: Breaking Up With The Old Republic

Obok hasn't aged well under the pressure of monthly payments.

I’ve been hesitant to commit, then I rashly got engaged. I sunk hours of play into my relationship with The Old Republic [TOR], now I’m calling it off. I purchased the game, paid the monthly subscription fees, then I realized I was not happy. I was no longer satisfied being in this costly relationship. The newness of our accord quickly wore off, and all that remained was the constant grind that constantly cost me $15 a month.

The first month passed. The newness of BioWare’s, well done, story arcs dried up like a Tusken Raider corpse sitting under Tatooine’s twin suns. Each time I launched Origin, I would hover my mouse over the TOR launch icon, just to move it away. Obok Stillsky’s bounty hunter blood no longer boiled for dangerous contracts, and my thirst for the Dark Side had been satiated . The only contract I was concerned about now, was the one I had with Electronic Arts.

Blizz, I knew you the least but I will miss you the most.

I never was a Massively Multiplayer Online [MMO] fanboy but I couldn’t resist  the lure of a well funded and developed Star Wars iteration. I realize now, that I will probably never be a MMO regular. TOR had all the makings of an MMO I could enjoy, and honestly it is a well made game but its biggest problem, for me, it’s an MMO. Some of the fault lies with me and the types of games I enjoy playing, which are anything but a MMO. One issue that I take no blame for is the soon to be archaic subscription model, that less and less MMOs are using.

The pain of me leaving is too much for her to bear; she can't stand to look me in the face.

Paying for a game, then continually paying for it on a monthly basis, is and will forever be foreign to me. With great games selling for $15 to $60 (not excluding superbly priced indie games that go for cheaper) that provide 100s of hours of game play, I have trouble justifying a $60 down payment in addition to monthly fees. The subscription model for MMOs are going the way of print and my experience with TOR was my first and last venture into this dying business model.

Not even a free TOR Tauntaun pet will bring me back.

Syrian Style Shogun

Total War: Shogun 2 has been a fun gallop. I’ve managed to spread my empire over half of Japan and just recently, I’ve drawn the attention of the Emperor himself. Attention is putting it lightly, I’ve drawn his scorn. The remaining clans have allied with him and in one turn, they’ve all declared war against me. This has not taken me by total surprise; I’ve crushed one clan after another under my daimyo’s (and his heirs’) samurai shoes, turned once free peasants into rice producing slaves and taxed the populous almost to the breaking point. Just like Bashar al-Assad, I’ve had it coming, and I most definitely deserve it.

My acclaim among the Japanese clans and the Emperor himself has gradually grown, demonstrated by the expansion of my lands and the in-game notoriety measure. My populous has made regular, feeble, attempts to overthrow my rule but my “peaceful” occupation of each newly conquered province has been resolute. My my daimyo’s rule is one dictated by sword and seed. A sword to keep the people inline and the seed to keep them fed and docile. I give them enough of the sword to fear me, and enough rice to appreciate me. This method has worked from one heir to the next but over time the cold winter of revolution will eventually grow into a spring. Even in a virtual Feudal Japan people rise up against a tyrant and allies align behind them, so should the same be done in the real world.

During my daimyo’s expansion I’ve made temporary packs and promises with other clans, only to break them when it benefited me and strengthen my grip on my provinces. I’ve sent messages of poetic pleasure to other rulers, putting their fears at ease, just so I can encircle them with my cavalry. I’ve opened trade and channels of diplomacy with western worlds with the promise of change at home, only to give my superior military time to entrench itself, and attack those who even peacefully oppose me. In this virtual game, the European traders are quick to sever their ties and their financial support when my legitimacy as a leader is obviously a fraud.

Shogun 2’s Japan has jointly risen to resist me but they will most likely end up at the end of my sword or knee deep in my rice fields. Other in-game countries will not get that involved outside of slap-on-the-hand trade embargoes. The game is not designed to be that encompassing, to include game changing actions from foreign powers, but our real world is. Thankfully my daimyo’s source of trade does directly benefit “his” people, in that they do get fed, but in our real world oil doesn’t go down well with with a cup of saki. I will eventually squash all those who oppose me and conquer all of Japan. I wont feel bad about it because it’s a game, and not real. What does trouble me however, is people’s lack of ability to distinguish between virtual tyranny and reality.

Skyrim: Books And Wolf-Copters.

*** SPOILERS BELOW***

After hearing, “You know, if you have the aptitude, you should join the Mage’s Guild in Winterhold.” about 100+ times during my first play-through/character of Skyrim, I finally did so. My second character, Kegels Grip, made the journey to the Mage’s College as an aspiring young destruction mage, with delusions of grandeur and plenty of aptitude. Upon his arrival to Winterhold, the importance of books became abundantly clear. In the world of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, books are almost as important as gold.

In Skyrim, books are a source of lore that dates back to previous Elder Scroll games and provide a historical perspective of key individuals, guilds and locations. They also have the potential to provide details to a location that could contain untold riches and most importantly, the ability to increase your talent in one of the 18 skills that are tied to leveling up. Books are a pretty big deal, they are also fairly well written and interesting. Those familiar with the series will enjoy a bit of nostalgia while browsing the, at most, 10 page books. Books in Skyrim can also provide you with clues on how to unlock a tomb and provide the player with a bit more immersion to his virtual surroundings.

No other guild puts as much focus and care to their books like the Mage’s Guild. It was during the Mage’s Guild main quest line that I was introduced to new areas (Fellglow Keep) and encounters. Even after 160+ hours with Randy Stardust, my first Skyrim character, I was still being awed by the vastness of Skyrim through Kegels Grip’s eyes. What better reason to be tasked with a quest in Skyrim, a world of dragons and literature, then by the Mage Guild’s librarian and his need to have some books “returned”.

Fellglow Keep, not much to look at from the outside.

Fellglow Keep was a fortress that I had never visited, despite its close proximity to Whiterun and other key locations in Skyrim. Fellglow Keep’s exterior is by no means as architecturally amazing as many of Skyrim’s other fortresses and ancient tombs, but its contents were. There were obviously wolfs lurking within the keep’s rooms for howling could be heard bouncing off the stone walls.Also within this fortress were a magnitude of rooms, jail cells and villains. Who would be interested in books from the Mage’s College? Mages of course! Fellglow was like an alternative school for mages. It housed conjurers, raising skeletal dead, and each kind of elemental mage you can think of. Interspersed within the alternative learning center that is Fellglow Keep, were imprisoned vampires used for experimentation and most entertainingly, target practice. One thing Skyrim gets right, that everyone can agree with, is how it properly mistreats the Twilight kind improperly. In Skyrim, everyone hates vampires.

How all those who "sparkle" are treated in Skyrim.

So after killing mages in vast numbers and freeing, then killing vampires, I ran into a memorable occurrence. After 170 hours of playing through Skyrim I still have moments that cause me to laugh out loud and Fellglow Keep was not a disappointment. Upon entering a dungeon, with levers controlling the jail cell doors setting dead center, I caught a mage off guard and unleashed a unrelenting spurt of electricity his way. As he fell just short of the levers I realized his intentions. The howling I heard for the last five minutes were originating behind the cell doors the unfortunate mage was attempting to open. Behind those bars were two wolves, who would of gladly ran distraction as their master shredded me with magic.

With the opportunity to toy with my would be killers, I placed a lightning rune in front of their cell door, prepped my most powerful fire spell and then, “Open sesame.” Almost at the exact moment that the first wolf tripped the lightning rune I unleashed my dual wielded fireball, hilarity ensued. The lightning rune lifted both the wolves off their feet and my fireball  propelled them even further, causing them both to spin like howling helicopters, right at me. I had the best seat in the house and just as the flaming wolves careened towards Kegels’ face the flame killed them and they slid across the floor, still rotating.

The wolf-copters alone made the journey worth it but after defeating a conjuration mage in a hard fought magic battle, were I cheated by ending it with a sword (that’s the punishment for overdue books), I was rewarded back at the mage college with… more books. These books however, all increased magic skills after reading them. In Skyrim, books are a pretty big deal and it pays to be well read.

Total War: Shogun 2 – Learning While Bleeding.

I’ve slowly immersed myself into the world of the Samurai as of late. Steam, once again, had my number and that number was $7.50, the great sales price for Total War: Shogun 2 [TWS2]. The Total War series involves large map, turn based, micromanagement of settlements/city states and beautifully detailed real-time game play of large scale battles involving hundreds, if not thousands, of units at once. Like most of the Total War games, developed by The Creative Assembly and published by SEGA, it is full of information pertaining to the period it is set in. TWS2 is played out during Japan’s feudal period (1185 – 1868) and it contains enough Samurai swords and deaths to satisfy the blood lust of any future Matsudaira Naritsugu.

During the three or four hours it took me to play through the tutorial campaign I spent just as much time, if not more, reading about all the different clans from this period, than actually controlling them. The micromanaging aspects of games has always come easy to me but when it comes to the real-time battles, I think a common peasant from feudal Japan could out play me, with one hand planting rice. I am like General Custer, who gets wiped out at Little Big Horn, except the odds are actually in my favor. Thankfully, the Total War games provide you with an auto-resolve option when facing a real-time battle and in TWS2 I use it regularly. About the only time I don’t choose the auto-resolve option is when the numerical and technological odds are so stack in my favor that even I, General Incompetent, can squeak out a victory.

One of the most entertaining and rewarding game play aspects of TWS2, for me, has been the use of special agents that can move around the map and perform special tasks. A Monk, or Missionary, unit can put a newly “acquired” population at ease or insight rebellion, a Meske can bribe opposing generals and manage settlements and a Geisha can spy in enemy territory and assassinate important individuals. My favorite agent, however, is the Ninja. Perhaps I’ve watched The Last Samurai to often and consider the Ninja the Samurai’s nemesis (which is not true but fun to fantasize about) and I use them against opposing Samurai armies as frequently as possible. The Ninja’s ability to assassinate and sabotage make him a very useful ally in the quest to conquer a new territory. What better way to prepare for a castle assault then ordering your ninja to open the gate?

TWS2 brings the eastern version of Medieval Europe into my hands and makes it available to play with. Feudal Japan was a time of bloodshed but also a time of philosophical advancement, literature and honor. Thanks to TWS2 I am able to enjoy war gaming in safety, open my mind to the copious amounts of knowledge and broaden my appreciation for the additions this far eastern culture provided – as long as no one sends a ninja to assassinate me.

Mountains Of Change: Skyrim’s Ability To Vary.

For over 153 hours my Wood Elf, Randy Stardust, picked locks, sneaked and killed from afar in the world of Skyrim. Randy took the reins of both the Thieves’ and Assassins’ guild, conquered Alduin (the main foe of the main quest line) and crushed the Stormcloak rebellion as an Imperial Legate. In short, Randy was a bad ass. There was no foe, nor group of foes, in the world of Skyrim that could best him. Randy saw the blood of his enemies and sadly, many of his friends run underneath his Dragonskin boots. His heart had grown cold and dead due to the amount of death that followed in his Dragonborn wake. He had quietly been searching for an end and this week, he embraced his death.

Randy was not defeated by any virtual foe. No dragon can clam fame from his demise. Randy just simply lived too long, in my mind. I had grown tired of Randy and his exploits. I had grown tired of killing my foes with an arrow from the shadows. I was tired of serving the Imperials that had almost signed Randy’s death warrant just as he was born onto the Skyrim landscape. No, Randy met his demise because gaming is one of the best deterrents to monotony. Randy died so another could live, and overwrite his saved game files. Born is Kegels Grip.

One of the last pictures of Randy Stardust.

Kegels Grip is almost the antithesis to Randy Stardust. An Imperial with a hatred for his own kind (they were going to hang him for just being in the wrong place at the wrong time) and a thirst for magic – Kegels desires power and an Imperial to use it against. Preferring to stand out in the open rather than skulk in the shadows, Kegels would rather dual wield spells while encased in armor than pepper targets from afar. Kegels is a battlemage and one of the best examples of the amount of variation today’s games can bring to today’s gamer.

A very green Kegels Grip.

Kegels Grip not only represents my inclination towards humorous word play but my appreciation for the level of variance one can pull from well designed games. Entirely new quest lines are at my fingertips because of the path I have chosen for Kegels. Past enemies are now friends and friends are now enemies. New adventures present Kegels and myself with new rewards. Within the first hour of Kegels life new locations, within Skyrim, were highlighted to visit – even after spending 153 hours exploring the world as Randy Stardust, may he rest in peace.

Part Emperor Palpatine, part Dragon, all Kegels Grip.

The ability to reinvent yourself is not unique to PC gaming but the ability to do it so quickly, is. It may be the end of Randy Stardust but in his death, appreciation for creation and change would not be as evident. In many ways Randy’s death helped enable the creation of Kegels avatar. Randy provided a standard to completely run away from so even in his death, parts of him live on in Kegels Grip. Gaming is a platform of constant change that one embraces rather fears. The ability to change with excitement in a virtual world makes it easier to accept change in the real world and embrace it as well. Here’s to change, both virtual and reality based.

The Quesh Mess and My Garden of Eaten.

The planet of Quesh, in The Old Republic, is overrun with mutant animals, infected with Republic scum and oozes toxins, unless refined, that are deadly to breathe. My back patio was overrun with insects, infected with rodent scum and oozed toxins from the cigarette butts of past renters. In both the world of The Old Republic and in the world that is my back patio, my goal was clear, clean this place up.

Quesh is inhospitable for the most part; unless you take a serum to help fight the toxic environment, you will quickly die on the planets surface. To add to the hostility of this planet, the toxins can be refined and used as war-turning adrenals, that boost the bodies healing abilities, reflexes and concentration. My patio’s environment was deadly, until winter blew gingerly through and killed the toxic leaves of the suffocating poison ivy and sumac. Once cleared, the patios limited ground space will be converted to produce nutrient rich vegetables.

Obok Stillsky and his companion Torian, go on safari.

The first to be cleared from Quesh’s surface are the Republic troops that stand in the way of both my credits and the Empire’s manufacturing of adrenals. I’ve started my killing spree and I’ve crippled the Republic’s toxic mining abilities. I can taste success and I can already see the credits piling up in my ships cargo hold. After raking, yanking out weeds and shoveling out roots, I can taste the bounty of vegetables in my mouth. I can imagine my refrigerator stocked with carrots and onions.

In the background, the flames of adrenal production.

I’ve laid down the foundation for the Empire’s conquest of Quesh. I’ve left Republic miners dead and even better, buried and alive within the same tunnels they were using to stockpile adrenal agents. I’ve turned the soil of my garden, coined The Garden of Eaten, and put down top soil that will be the foundation of my gardens growth. I’ve lined my pockets with blood-credits of fallen Republic soldiers and I’ve lined my patio with contractor grade edging.

As I near my triumph on Quesh and within my backyard, I become embolden. I start  to plant the seeds of multiple victories over the Republic forces, taking all offered missions. Standing on my patio, I can see the Dark Side within the freshly turned over dark soil. I am energized and my plans for my Garden of Eaten expand like the conquering vines of the Sith Empire
.